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DEADLY ENVIRONMENT

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This report looks at known killings of people defending environmental and land rights. It identifies a clear rise in such deaths from 2002 and 2013 as competition for natural resources intensifies. In the most comprehensive global analysis of the problem on record, we have found that at least 908 people have died in this time. Disputes over industrial logging, mining and land rights are the key drivers, and Latin America and Asia-Pacific particularly hard hit.

Deadly Environment also highlights a severe shortage of information or monitoring of this problem, meaning the total is likely to be higher than the report documents. This lack of attention is feeding endemic levels of impunity, with just over one per cent of the perpetrators known to have been convicted.

Overall, the report shows how it has never been more important to protect the environment, and it has never been more deadly. It calls on national governments and the international community to act urgently to protect the environment and the citizens who defend it.

Global Witness campaigns to end the unfair and unsustainable exploitation of natural resources, so that all can thrive within the planet’s boundaries. We address the root causes of the exploitation that destroys lives and threatens life-supporting ecosystems.

*A time lag on reporting means killings for 2013 are likely to be higher than we have been able to show here.

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Source: Global Witness

 

 

Civil Society Submission to the Green Climate Fund on Accreditation, Safeguards and Fiduciary Standards

The Green Climate Fund is developing a set of environmental and social safeguard standards and an associated accreditation process to enable agencies, organisations or governments to access they funds it will make available for climate change mitigation and adaption activities. Key concerns shared by civil society and indigenous peoples have been brought to the attention of the Board of the GCF and of the expert group tasked with developing these standards.

Source: FPP

Attachments:
Download this file (final-accreditation-and-safeguards-cso-submission-21-march-2014.pdf)CSOs_Submission[ ]1229 kB

TEBTEBBA Submission on Providing Incentives and Addressing Methodological Issues Related to Non-Carbon Benefits (NCBs) Resulting from the Implementation of REDD-Plus Activities

The Subsidiary Body on Scientific and Methodological Advise (SBSTA), in its thirty-eight session, invited Parties and admitted observer organizations to submit to the Secretariat, by 26 March 2014, their views on methodological issues related to non-carbon benefits resulting from the implementation of REDD-Plus activities (FCCC/SBSTA/2013/3, paragraph 40). Further consideration of methodological issues related to NCBs will resume in SBSTA 40th session in June of 2014. Additionally, it was decided that part of the preparations for SBSTA 40, Parties should begin identifying and prioritizing NCBs at the national level.

Attachments:
Download this file (Tebtebba Submission on NCBs.pdf)TEBTEBBA_NCBs[ ]934 kB

SUBMISSION BY THE REDD+ SAFEGUARDS WORKING GROUP, THE ACCRA CAUCUS, AND MEMBERS OF THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ CAUCUS ON THE METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES RELATED TO NON-CARBON BENEFITS RESULTING FROM THE IMPLEMENTATION OF REDD+ ACTIVITIES

Parties now acknowledge that NCBs are a critical part of REDD+ activities and are “crucially important for the long-term viability and sustainability of REDD+ implementation.”[1] At COP 19 in Warsaw, Parties recognized “the importance of incentivizing non-carbon benefits for the long-term sustainability of the implementation of [REDD+] activities.”[2] The importance of NCBs is also highlighted by other REDD+ initiatives, such as the UN-REDD Programme and the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), and by UN bodies such as the Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD).

 


 

[1] Document FCCC/CP/2013/5, paragraph 56

 

[2] Decision 9/CP.19, paragraph 22

Attachments:
Download this file (SBSTA ncb submission FINAL.doc)Submission_NCBs[ ]67 kB

Summary of the 15th RRI Dialogue on Forests, Governance, and Climate Change: Challenges of Carbon Rights and Implementing the New Warsaw Agreement on REDD+

The Fifteenth Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) Dialogue on Forests, Governance, and Climate Change convened at the Newseum in Washington, DC, US, on 19 March 2014, under the theme of “Challenges of Carbon Rights and Implementing the New Warsaw Agreement on REDD+.” Approximately 100 participants attended the event, with over 500 more (from 65 countries) engaging virtually through a live webcast.

Attachments:
Download this file (RRI_Forest_CC_REDD.pdf)Summary[ ]2430 kB
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