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The Indigenous Women's Roles and Contributions in the Sustainable Management of Healthy Forests: RECOGNIZE, RESPECT and ENHANCE

INDIGENOUS WOMEN, TRADITIONAL LIVELIHOODS AND FOOD SECURITY

  • Indigenous peoples' territories are home to 80% of the world's biodiversity and cover up to 22% of the world's land surface.
  • More than 100 million indigenous peoples in Asia depend on forests and other natural resources for their livelihoods, cultural practices and overall wellbeing
  • Indigenous women are the repository of indigenous knowledge on seeds, crop varieties, medicinal plants, culturally important trees, wild crops and harvesting seasons.
  • Indigenous women are the key actors in shifting cultivation/rotational agriculture and contribute to the food security and wellbeing of millions of people.
  • Indigenous women deeply value and sustainably manage and monitor healthy forests.
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Download this file (indigenious women posterfinald3.jpg)Nepali Version[ ]13652 kB
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Research on the Roles and Contributions of Indigenous Women in Sustainable Resource Management in Asia: Case Studies from India, Nepal and Vietnam

Across the different case studies, common and general recommendations in relation to the roles and contributions of indigenous women in sustainable forest management can be drawn. Moreover, the research has identified case-specific recommendations for each country (see case studies).

--It is vital to raise awareness that indigenous peoples’ lives depend on their right to land and access to forests, and that their livelihood practices are environmentally sound and sustainable. In particular, the traditional knowledge and the essential roles of indigenous women in sustainable resource management processes, the maintenance and promotion of biodiversity as well as in the transmission of knowledge and culture need to be widely understood and recognized. Moreover, it is essential to create a broad public understanding that forests are best protected and promoted if communities are given the responsibility for their conservation and regeneration. Initiatives and measures of forest preservation and management by indigenous women should be given greater support.

Attachments:
Download this file (For Web_Research on the Roles.pdf)For Web_Research on the Roles.pdf[Case Studies from India, Nepal and Vietnam]1759 kB

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Briefing Paper: Recognition of Indigenous Peoples' Customary Land Rights in Asia

In Asia, various legal instruments have been used to recognize indigenous peoples within the legal framework of State. States have recognized indigenous peoples through constitutional provision, special laws, and court decisions and/or through ratification or adoption of international instruments. However, legal recognition by states does not always guarantee the full range and enjoyment by indigenous peoples of their individual and collective rights as provided in international instruments such as the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

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(New Briefing Paper) Traditional Knowledge of Indigenous Peoples: Why Should it be at the heart of discussion on Early Warning Systems and Agriculture?

Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP) would like to provide the following recommendations to the 42nd session of the SBSTA:

--Recognize, protect, document and promote the rich traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples relating to disasters and weather forecasting

--Build the capacity of indigenous peoples to understand and use appropriate modern technology and tools relating to early warning systems

--Guarantee the access of indigenous peoples to appropriate disaster risk reductions tools and techniques

Attachments:
Download this file (For Web_FINAL_TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES.pdf)For Web_FINAL_TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES.pdf[Traditional Knowledge of Indigenous Peoples: Why Should it be at the heart of SBSTA Discussion on Early Warning Systems and Agriculture]784 kB

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Briefing Paper on the Rights of Indigenous Women to their Lands, Territories and Resources in Asia

Indigenous women and men in Asia manage and share the same resources and livelihood systems in their lands and territories. Nevertheless, they assume gender specific and distinct roles and responsibilities in natural resource management practices and conservation systems. Women in many indigenous societies in Asia, manage and conserve lands, territories and resources and are responsible for ensuring food for the family and securing nutrition, collecting firewood, wild foods and crops, maintaining seeds and harvests, fetching water and managing agricultural fields. Consequently, they have an intimate and interconnected relationship with nature, lands, territories and the natural resources therein, including the sites of cultural and spiritual significance. Women also nurture and transfer the knowledge and wisdom to the future generations.

Attachments:
Download this file (Edited_Briefing Paper on Rights of Indigenous Women.pdf)Briefing Paper on Rights of IP Women[ ]1251 kB

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